IAM And RoSPA Tests

If you’ve passed your driving test, and want to take your skills further, one of the advanced driving tests may be the way to go.

2 of the more well known are the IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) and RoSPA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents). Both adopt a slightly different way of driving and marking to the DSA driving test. If you are interested in either of these, take a look at a book called ‘Roadcraft’.

The IAM Test

The Advanced Driving Test lasts roughly 90 minutes and usually covers between 30/40 miles along a variety of road types – including city and country driving, dual carriageways and motorways (if available).

The Examiner is often a current, or ex Police Driving Instructor so they know what they are talking about. During the test they will thoroughly assess your driving ability according to the different road conditions. While on the test you will dela with various hazards and situations, using the skills and techniques that have been developed while undergoing the advanced driving course. This training can come from a local IAM group, or from an experienced Instructor.

Your Examiner will be looking for confident, safe driving, using optimum road positioning and excellent observation, to safely deal with unpredictable roads. The main criteria for passing the test is to display a consistent, solid driving performance in all road situations, rather than excelling in just one specific occasion.

This Advanced Driving Test is not easy but is within the reach of all drivers given the right guidance – with many applicants commenting on how much they enjoyed the drive or ride.

Rob has passed the IAM test, so knows full well what to expect. If you would like to find out more about this test, click here.

RoSPA Test

This test is very similar to the IAM in the style of driving. The main difference is that instead of pass or fail, if you do pass, you get graded bronze, silver or gold. A pass that results in a gold is the highest driving standard available to civilians.

For more information take a look here.